What Knitting or Crocheting Can Teach Us

 

As a designer, I spend many hour escaping into the Ravelry world, an amazing knitting and crocheting community (website) where people come and stay. For hours sometimes.

I click through 10, 15, 100 versions of the same shawl pattern (or dishcloth, sock, scarf, hat pattern), looking intently at the yarns used, the projects created from it, the way it looks in a worsted weight yarn vs. a fingering weight yarn. Which then starts down another rabbit hole of the actual yarn and what people created with that yarn–hats, baby blankets, socks, to name a few.

It soothes my soul, relaxes my over-stimulated-creative mind. But, even as a designer I have to wonder why people would knit a lace shawl that takes months to create such a complicated pattern. I guess because there’s something for everyone.

Here’s the thing about our online knitting or crochet community: we compare our projects, shaking our heads sometimes as to why someone would use that yarn or needle size, when clearly, in my own mind, I wouldn’t.

But that’s not for me to judge. Or even mention.

There’s a clear understanding that when someone posts a photo of their finished object, a lot of love, care and time has gone into producing that completed project. We should cheer her or him on and not make comments as to the clashing colors or think, I wouldn’t have done it in that yarn.

I ran across this the other day and shuddered. I did. Because it made me feel angry that someone would be so unkind to comment like that. I’m sure they didn’t realize it actually came across the way it did. But…It did!

So, I guess the moral of this story is, be kind when commenting on others photos. If you already do, which I’m sure you all do, good on you!

One Kind Word can Change Someones Entire Day

I know I’m not going to please everyone, but I’m ok with that. We all have different tastes in yarns, patterns, the way we photograph our finished objects. That’s what makes each and every one of us knitters or crocheters unique!And, I love that! And YOU!

The shawl at the top of the page is in my favorites. On Raverly.  I plan to knit this. I love the texture, the worsted weight yarn. I’m going to find a soft cotton worsted and knit it for summer evenings. 

Feel free to visit my Ravelry store if you’re interested. 

Hugs,

~DEB

What is Color Inspiration to You

Hi Knitters!

I’m always in the mood to create things that help in my color inspiration. Whether, it be paint chips (that I admittedly took in handfuls from Home Depot), Pinterest Mood boards, or browsing through magazines your neighbor hands you as you are getting in your car.

It’s all about color theory…basically, how to select colors that go together.

This lesson will be basic information that I hope you can take and use.

Imagine your caked yarn, or balls if that’s how you roll, 🙂 is organized around the color wheel.

 Most yarn companies are mindful of their colors, and making them compatible. We all seem to have our favorite yarn companies, the good news is, they have kept that in mind when selecting colors that work well together.

Designers, yarn companies, and other fiber gurus have figured out (for us) this color theory, so all we have to do is choose the colors we like.

Here’s the basic method:
Analogous colors are next to each other on the color wheel.  These are the colors that are near/next to each other and work well together. Generally sticking to 2, 3 or 4 colors.

Complimentary colors are done in pairs and sit directly opposite each other on the color wheel and pack a punch. This is my ideal way to choosing colors when I use the color wheel. I’d recommend going out to your craft store and picking one up. It’s a great tool to have in your box.

Split Analogous colors are the colors that are next to the complimentary colors. Example would be, choose your favorite color on the color wheel, zip straight across. The 2-4 colors on either side of that one color are the Split Analogous colors. Again, choosing 2 or more colors and sticking with every other color on the color wheel.

Another thing that works well, and is cheap (because any home store has walls of them for you to take) are the paint sample chips or cards. They have laid out similar tones on one sheet for you. Don’t even get me started on the hundred of crafty things you can do with them. I follow this board.  A blog post all it’s own. Hey, that would be fun to explore. 🙂 Though, this blanket is crochet, can you imagine the possibilities with knit stitches? Oh, how my mind works in so many mysterious ways.

*taking note as to a next blog post*

A Paint Chip Blanket

So, how about creating your own mood board, or perhaps collecting some paint cards. Get that inspiration flowing with a color wheel. Everyone is a photographer in some way, and I also believe everyone is a designer in some way, as well.

Get Creative and Knit ON, friends!

Deb Buckingham, Author/Designer
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BOOK REVIEW: Warm Days, Cool Knits

When I receive a book to review, I immediately sit down and flip through. My first thought was, well done Corrina! The layout was simple. The sections referenced the four seasons. And, the photography showed off the details of each piece.

Author: Corrina Ferguson
Paperback: Warm Days, Cool Knits
Publisher: Interweave/F+W
Number of pages: 144
Retail Price: $24.99

This book allows you to create a versatile, any-climate wardrobe. 

After living the majority of her life in Ohio, Corrina moved to Florida where she experienced a bit of culture shop. The weather is definitely different, though this book will provide you projects for Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. 

All the projects included in this book are made with DK weight yarn and lighter . The perfect anytime knitting experience. Stitches that are textured, cabled and lace will be closet staples that are fresh and wearable.

I highly recommend this book. I found (at least) 4 things I will definitely knit and wear. Socks, shawls, a cute tank, and a hat. All the projects in this book are titled with Old-Fashioned Southern names. You all know how I love that!

Emmylou

Leora

Weldon

               Williston



I really enjoy a good accessory knit. I know you will too. So,  pop over and have a peek, or visit your LYS and pick up your own copy. I would even get in ring bound on the side. This will be a constant go-to. 

As I always say,
Knit On!

Deb Buckingham, Author/Designer


Re-vising, Re-writing, and Re-photographing

Hi Knitters!

There comes a time when one must update the earliest of patterns. The styling is all wrong. The format of the pattern looked oddly “off”. 

It was time for a makeover. This pattern was written so long ago, I had forgotten about it. But, after listing all my designs for their much needed re-do, I was quickly reminded how much I loved it.

You will too!

An Admire Cowl
by Deb Buckingham

I’m thrilled with this cowl design. Super fast. Fun. Addicting.

Fashionable, simple, yet sophisticated. Ideal for the guy or gal ready for work or play. A great throw on to compliment your outfit, or take your furry friend for a walk. This cowl is rich in texture, yet simple enough to work as an instant gratification project.

Made with worsted weight yarn and a US #8 circular needle.

The color I chose works for my personality, I’m sure the color you choose will be just right for yours. It’s warm and cozy on a cool day, though keeps you toasty on a wintry day.
This piece is versatile and great for male or female who love a simple cowl design.

Make it as wide as you like. Just add more repeats. It’s that easy. Thick or thin is in.
An Admired Cowl is one that will definitely be admired every time you wear it. Wrap it twice for added warmth, or let it hang long to dress up or down your outfit.
To check out the necklace and other fun accessories to go with your cowl, please visit my Origami Owl Website

Knit On!
Deb

Magazine Review: Artist & Makers

  

Hello Knitters and Creators,

I figured since I enjoyed the last issue  so much, I’d share with you the Spring 2015 issue.

Magazine: Artists & Makers, Spring 2015
Publisher: Interweave/F+W 
Format: Digital or Paper
Retail: $9.99

I’m at Starbucks working away today. The part I love about my job is it’s portable. The other part of my job is, being able to review amazing magazines as this.

Let me take you on a virtual tour…

This issue is about going public–engaging in social media, a booth at an art show, or even building a website. And much more!

Meet cool featured artists like Tula Pink. Oh my gosh, I fell in love with her and her story. She’s a colorful textile designer who has stayed true to herself. You will love her too.

Again, more featured artists. I think, for me, these stories drive home the reason I do what I love to do. For example Jonathon Adler takes you through his day. A typical day for him begins with tea and ends with a nice roast chicken.

Perfect, huh?

Pat Sloan states, “I don’t sit and make quilts all day, I run a business most of the time. I’m lucky that I also get to make quilts as part of that.”

This is where it is for me. A business woman meets creative woman. I feel that those lucky enough to call their (craft) a business, should spend time with this magazine. It will make you say, YES! It will give you that warm feeling that makes you feel what you’re doing is the real deal.

This magazine is the perfect pairing with your favorite beverage. In my case, coffee or tea. I will honestly cozy up on the couch and read it from cover to cover.

I would highly recommend you find yourself a copy.

So, I bid you much love knitters and creators. I encourage you to take a peek at this magazine if you are a creator of any kind. You will appreciate the depth of this magazine.

You won’t be sorry. Have I ever steered you wrong?

Knit On!

Deb