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What Knitting or Crocheting Can Teach Us

 

Hipstershawlraverly
Hipster Shawl 

As a designer, I spend many hour escaping into the Ravelry world, an amazing knitting and crocheting community (website) where people come and stay. For hours sometimes.

I click through 10, 15, 100 versions of the same shawl pattern (or dishcloth, sock, scarf, hat pattern), looking intently at the yarns used, the projects created from it, the way it looks in a worsted weight yarn vs. a fingering weight yarn. Which then starts down another rabbit hole of the actual yarn and what people created with that yarn–hats, baby blankets, socks, to name a few.

It soothes my soul, relaxes my over-stimulated-creative mind. But, even as a designer I have to wonder why people would knit a lace shawl that takes months to create such a complicated pattern. I guess because there’s something for everyone.

Here’s the thing about our online knitting or crochet community: we compare our projects, shaking our heads sometimes as to why someone would use that yarn or needle size, when clearly, in my own mind, I wouldn’t.

But that’s not for me to judge. Or even mention.

There’s a clear understanding that when someone posts a photo of their finished object, a lot of love, care and time has gone into producing that completed project. We should cheer her or him on and not make comments as to the clashing colors or think, I wouldn’t have done it in that yarn.

I ran across this the other day and shuddered. I did. Because it made me feel angry that someone would be so unkind to comment like that. I’m sure they didn’t realize it actually came across the way it did. But…It did!

So, I guess the moral of this story is, be kind when commenting on others photos. If you already do, which I’m sure you all do, good on you!

One Kind Word can Change Someones Entire Day

I know I’m not going to please everyone, but I’m ok with that. We all have different tastes in yarns, patterns, the way we photograph our finished objects. That’s what makes each and every one of us knitters or crocheters unique!And, I love that! And YOU!

The shawl at the top of the page is in my favorites. On Raverly.  I plan to knit this. I love the texture, the worsted weight yarn. I’m going to find a soft cotton worsted and knit it for summer evenings. 

Feel free to visit my Ravelry store if you’re interested. 

Hugs,

~DEB

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Ebook Release

Dishcloth DivaClub (2)

Hey friends!

As I begin to embark on this whole self-publishing journey (my publisher rolled up the sidewalk and closed the door), I’m quickly reminded of how not very tech-savvy I really am. I can definitely use and get around a computer, but when it comes to the nitty-gritty back end work of certain software, well…it’s challenging.

But, I got through it.

And, I’ll do it again.

And, I’ll feel even more accomplished next time.

An ebook for me is a step in the right igotthis

direction. Learning a new skill always takes time and practice. But, I nailed it!

You can get a copy of my new Dishcloth Diva Club Ebook on Ravelry.  Please read all the details in this link. It’s a month-month type of thing.

I’d love to hear your comments, thoughts and perhaps see your photos.

Happy Knitting!

Deb

 

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K the knits and P the purls…Reading Your Work

Has it ever confused you, when reading a pattern it states, K the knits, and P the purls? It did for me too, until…

I found an easy way to do this when you’re unsure of how to read your work. What I mean by read your work is, by identifying what a knit stitch looks like, versus a purl stitch. In laymen terms, the knit stitches look like little v-neck sweaters or nice and smooth with no bump, the purl stitches look like little turtle-neck sweaters or bumps.

When you come to the a stitch that appears to have a v-neck sweater on or smooth, you knit it, a turtle-neck sweater on or a bump, you purl it.

If that is still a bit confusing, here’s my way:

You are instructed to K the knits and P the purls on the WS rows.

Example:
Row 1 (RS) Knit
Row 2 and all WS rows: K the knit sts and P the purl sts
Row 3: *k3, p2, k5, p7, [k1, p1] twice, p1; repeat from * across
Row 5: k
Row 6: same as 2

Repeat this 6 row pattern xxxx times

Okay, here’s my trick…
Row 1: knit across the sts
Row 2 (WS): purl across the sts
Row 3: *k3, p2, k5, p7, [k1, p1] twice, p1; repeat from * across
Row 4 (WS): K1, [k1, p1] twice, k7, p5, k2, p3
Row 5: knit
Row 6 (WS): purl

Now, what did I just do?

I knit Row 1 as instructed
I changed the knit stitch in row 1 to a purl stitch in Row 2
I did Row 3 as written
I changed the knit stitch (in row 3) to a purl stitch in Row 4, but started at the end of the row, as that’s what I ended with on Row 3. Basically reading the previous row backwards and changing every knit stitch to a purl stitch. (refer to row 4 above)
I did Row 5 as written
I changed the knit stitch in row 5 to a purl stitch in Row 6 


Clear as mud?

The whole idea of knitting the knit stitches and purling the purl stitches, usually on the WS rows, is to reverse your work, creating a finished looking design on the WS as well.

This whole concept is easy once you do it. If you would have had a k3 border on each end, you continue in the border pattern, then do the reverse stitch for the WS rows, or whatever row they ask you to do it on.

I’ve provided 2 ways for you to hopefully better understand the reading of your work.

So, as I always say,
Knit On!
Deb